Monasteries of Fruška Gora

Across an area 50 km long and 10 km wide, in the Fruška Gora hills in the district of Srem, there are 16 Serbian Orthodox monasteries built in the late Middle Ages, when the focal point of Serbian culture migrated under pressure from Turkish attack to an area situated in what was then the southern Kingdom of Hungary. This region of unique culture and historical value has been designated a cultural property of exceptional importance to Serbia.

Most of the monasteries were built under the influence of the Morava and Raška schools of architecture and over time have been significantly renovated. Renovation work resulted in churches gaining tall, multilevel bell-towers with baroque decorations, and interiors decorated in large, complex Baroque iconostases, painted by the greatest Serbian artists of the day.

Their turbulent past, their architectural and artistic beauty, and their special role as a spiritual focal point of the Serbian people all contributed to the great importance of the monasteries within the cultural and historical heritage of Serbia. The general area of Fruška Gora has been rich in religious sites since ancient times, and during the 16th and 17th centuries 35 monasteries were recorded here. From their founding, these monasteries have been robbed, demolished and abandoned countless times, with the worst destruction inflicted during the Second World War. Several monasteries were also seriously damaged during the NATO bombing in 1999.

Travelling from west to east we find the monasteries of Privina Glava, Divša, Kuveždin, Petkovica, Šišatovac, Bešenovo, Mala Remeta, Beočin, Rakovac, Jazak, Vrdnik, Staro Hopovo, Novo Hopovo, Grgeteg, Velika Remeta and Krušedol.